GEORAPHICAL MYSTERY TOUR

WOW – WHAT AN AMAZING DAY! – FOLLOWING OUR INQUIRY THEME AS TO WHAT MAKES PLACES SIMILAR OR DIFFERENT ? THE MIDDLES  WENT  A – WALKING IN WHAT WERE IDEAL CONDITIONS – THOUGH A LITTLE WARM.

Prior to this we had looked at  some of the Pre- History of the area including a long time resident of 50+ years  John.  He gave us an account of dusty roads, orchards – blackberries – poultry farms – early buildings and families who first lived here right through to today’s present surroundings.

We visited two places – Wurundjeri Walk and then The Blackburn South Shopping District. We took photos of a range of natural and man made features – plants and animals – later comparing the two. Stay tuned for student insights – in the meantime here are some snaps of our day.

A BIG THANK YOU TO THE AMAZING MUMS WHO ASSISTED  – 

IN PARTICULAR OUR MIDDLE C MUMS – GENEVIEVE , JACQUI, SHARON AND KIM – SO IMPORTANT TO OUR DAY – SO HELPFUL

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REMEMBRANCE DAY

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Remembrance Day
Cenotaph London.jpg

The Cenotaph at Whitehall, London on Remembrance Day 2004
Official name Remembrance Day
Also called Poppy Day
Observed by Commonwealth of Nations(except Mozambique)
Type International
Significance Commemorates Commonwealth war dead
Observances Parades, silences
Date 11 November
Next time 11 November 2014
Frequency annual
Related to Armistice DayVeterans Day,Memorial DayAnzac Day

Remembrance Day (also known as Poppy Day) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth of Nations member states since the end of the First World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. The day, specifically designated by King George V on 7 November 1919,[1] or alternative dates, are also recognised as special days for war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended “at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month”, in accordance with the armistice signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. (“At the 11th hour” refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) The First World War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.[2]

The memorial evolved out of Armistice Day, which continues to be marked on the same date. The initial Armistice Day was observed at Buckingham Palace, commencing with King George V hosting a “Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic[3] during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace the following morning.

The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem In Flanders Fields. These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their brilliant red colour became a symbol for the blood spilled in the war.